Published: Thu, October 12, 2017
World | By Melba Underwood

North Korea hackers steal South Korea war plans

North Korea hackers steal South Korea war plans

European Union ambassadors last month agreed new sanctions against the North, according to diplomatic sources, including a ban on investments in North Korea and on European Union exports of oil.

North Korea has launched two missiles over Japan and conducted its sixth and biggest nuclear test in recent weeks in defiance of U.N. sanctions as it races towards its goal of developing a nuclear-tipped missile capable of hitting the United States. -South Korean wartime "decapitation strike" plans against the North, according to South Korean media reports.

(Korean Central News Agency) In this handout photo released by the South Korean Defense Ministry, South Korea's Hyunmu-2 ballistic missile is fired during an exercise aimed to counter North Korea's nuclear test on September 4, 2017 in East Coast, South Korea.

Rep. Lee Cheol-hee, a lawmaker for the ruling Democratic Party who sits on the National Defense Committee, said defense sources told him that North Korean hackers past year stole the classified U.S.

At the end of last month, North Korea's foreign minister Ri Yong-ho said that the U.S. had "declared war" on the authoritarian state and was "right" to shoot down American planes.

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Among the classified plans allegedly stolen from the South were said to be blueprints for targeted attacks by Seoul and Washington to eliminate North Korean leader Kim Jong Un if a crisis breaks out or appears imminent.

Outside governments and global human rights organizations say Kim rules as a tyrant over a largely malnourished and abused population while enjoying a luxurious lifestyle backed up by a weapons program almost advanced enough to viably target the USA mainland with nuclear-tipped missiles. Kim is the third generation of his family to rule North Korea. He revealed that around 235 gigabytes of military documents had been stolen from the Defence Integrated Data Centre, and that 80% of them have yet to be identified.

Seoul says North Korea has repeatedly staged cyberattacks on South Korean business and government websites.

The training was part of a programme of "extended deterrence" against North Korea, it added.

Commenting on the news is Chris Doman, security researcher at AlienVault, who is investigating hacking groups in North Korea.

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