Published: Fri, November 10, 2017
Science | By Eileen Rhodes

Facebook Wants Your Nude Pics Now To Stop Revenge Porn Later

Facebook Wants Your Nude Pics Now To Stop Revenge Porn Later

Would you trust Facebook with your nude photos?

The pilot is meant to help prevent "revenge porn", or having intimate images shared across the social network without the owner's permission.

Humans rather than algorithms will view the naked images voluntarily sent to Facebook in a scheme being trialled in Australia to combat revenge porn.

The scheme is aimed at people who are anxious partners or ex-partners may share the images without their consent - and is being trialled in Australia, the US, Canada and the UK.

There are fears the images could be found before being deleted, intercepted on their way to Facebook, or people could get around the technology by simply resizing images.

"We're pleased to work with the eSafety Commissioner as the only Australian representative on our working group on this important initiative, and applaud her leading role in promoting online safety across the country", said Mia Garlick, Facebook's Director of Policy A-NZ.

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According to the eSafety office, Facebook users who are concerned that an intimate image of them may end up online can complete an online form.

A spokesperson states in order for a photo to qualify as revenge porn an employee of Facebook must view the image first for themselves.

Antigone Davis, Facebook's head of global safety, said the system is being trialled in the UK, US, Australia and Canada. While Facebook originally announced these plans in April, the pilot program is now underway.

The pilot program will also be tested in the United Kingdom, and Canada, as well as here in the USA, where one in 25 Americans have been a victim of revenge porn.

Once Facebook is notified, they use image-matching technology to access and tag the image to prevent anyone from sharing it on their platforms.

On the other hand, eSafety commissioner Julie Inman Grant told AFP, "It removes control and power from the perpetrator who is ostensibly trying to amplify the humiliation of the victim amongst friends, family and colleagues".

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