Published: Wed, January 10, 2018
Health Care | By Alberto Manning

Study links ibuprofen to infertility

Study links ibuprofen to infertility

"Ibuprofen works really well as a painkiller and fever-reducing medicine, so there are of course a number of cases where taking it is sensible", he says.

In the latest research, scientists looked at the impact of ibuprofen on 31 healthy young men over six weeks and performed further tests on cells and pieces of human testes in the lab. Ibuprofen lowered testosterone production in the tissues, but levels of the hormone remained the same in the men.

"For men, it is important their testosterone level remains at a stable level".

Those who took the ibuprofen were more likely to have indications of testicular problems - including a condition called compensated hypogonadism that affects reproductive health - meaning men are less likely to be able to father a child. LH's job is to stimulate the production of testosterone, so higher levels of LH without corresponding higher levels of testosterone could suggest an issue in the way the body's hormones are functioning.

Previous research by the team, which focused on pregnant women, had found that the use of Paracetamol and Ibuprofen during pregnancy affected the testicles of male babies.

Next, the researchers tested the direct effect of ibuprofen on testicles, using samples that had been taken from organ donors.

More news: BBC gender pay row out in the open after Carrie Gracie's resignation

Taking the common painkiller ibuprofen has been linked in a small study with a condition affecting male fertility problems. Some took 1,200 milligrams of ibuprofen - commonly known as Advil or Motrin, among others - every day in two 600 mg doses over a six-week period, while others received a placebo.

'Concern has been raised over increased male reproductive disorders in the Western world and the disruption of male hormones has been suggested to play a central role.

Several experts have reacted to the study findings.

However, because the study is small, more research is needed to confirm the results. But researchers are concerned about long-term use among athletes.

The hormonal imbalance caused compensated hypogonadism, which is a condition linked to decreased male fertility, depression, and an increased risk of heart attack or stroke.

The good news is that the problems required multiple weeks of constant ibuprofen use, so there's no indication that handling the odd muscle ache or hangover with ibuprofen will cause problems.

Like this: