Quincy, IL News - Journal930.com
Quincy, IL News - Journal930.com
Friday, Oct 9, 2015

Blessing Hospital recertified as an Advanced Primary Stroke Center

Blessing Hospital recertified as an Advanced Primary Stroke Center

1 year, 1 month ago from Blessing Hospital

Has held designation since 2010

Blessing Hospital has retained its Gold Seal of Approval™ from The Joint Commission to be an Advanced Primary Stroke Center as the result of a recent on-site survey. Blessing Hospital first achieved Primary Stroke Center designation in March 2010.

An independent, not-for-profit organization, the Joint Commission is recognized internationally as the leader in evaluating the quality and safety of healthcare delivered by over 15,000 organizations across the country. The Joint Commission’s Primary Stroke Center Certification was developed in collaboration with the American Heart Association and American Stroke Association.

Stroke involves interruption of blood flow to the brain.  It is the nation’s fourth leading cause of death and a leading cause of serious, long-term disability. Nationally about 795,000 people experience a new or recurrent stroke each year. Blessing Hospital provides care to some 300 stroke patients from around the region annually.

 Being a Primary Stroke Center tells the residents of the region that Blessing Hospital provides safe, high quality care, treatment and services to stroke patients from onset through rehabilitation.

 “The certification demonstrates Blessing Hospital’s stroke care program follows national standards and guidelines that can significantly improve outcomes for stroke patients,” says Connie Scott, MS, RN NEA-BC, administrative director, Specialty Care Services, who leads the stroke program.

“We have an excellent interdisciplinary team of professionals including emergency department physicians, neurologists, emergency medical personnel, nurses, medical staff, clinical nurse specialists, educators, physical therapists, occupational therapists, speech language pathologists, pharmacists and others that make it all happen,” she continued.

 “For the stroke care process to work properly, patients must recognize stroke symptoms and respond,” Scott added. “A stroke patient’s best chance for recovery begins when they call 9-1-1 as soon as they recognize the symptoms.  It is important to note the time when symptoms first appear. If given within three hours of the first symptom, there is an FDA-approved medication, commonly known as a clot-buster, which may reduce long-term disability for the most common type of stroke. Too many people wait before seeking care which leads to serious and sometimes irreversible damage being done.”

Common stroke symptoms include:

• Sudden numbness or weakness of the face, arm or leg – especially on one side of the body,

• Sudden confusion, trouble speaking or understanding,

• Sudden trouble seeing in one or both eyes,

• Sudden trouble walking, dizziness, loss of balance or coordination,

• Sudden severe headache with no known cause.